April 2014 Message Toolkit

Categories: Resources

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Very shortly, birds will be singing and trees will be sending out buds and blossoms. It’s the time of year when many of us feel that familiar tickle in the back of our throats, signaling the beginning of allergy season. As the days become warmer, smog forms more readily and may act as a trigger for asthma and other respiratory problems. The bad news is that climate change is expected to worsen air pollution and respiratory disease. The good news is that people can take actions that will both protect their health and benefit the climate.

Our messages for the month of April focus on the links between climate change, air quality, and health. Along with being seasonally appropriate, these messages set the stage for Air Quality Awareness Week (April 28th-May 2nd) at the end of the month. Our messengers are three Maryland health professionals: Clifford Mitchell and Crystal Upperman, with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and Cindy Parker, from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Download the Guide, as well as other media below, including social media graphics, Facebook and Twitter content, a fact sheet, and posters in size 8.5×11 that you can print yourself, or size 11×17 that can be produced inexpensively by any copy or print facility.

Key Messages

  • Protect our air, health & climate
  • Climate change means more pollen, pollution, and problems for people with allergies and asthma.
  • This spring, take a break from traffic and bike or walk instead.

Guest Blog Posts

Additional Online Resources

Graphic Design by Joe Barsin

April 2014 Guide

April Calendar of Activities

Individualized Posters for Member Organizations

Flyer_4-2014_ProtectOurAir

Back to Monthly Climate Observances page

 

Actions to Take

  • Send press release
  • Send member e-mail
  • Distribute posters and fact sheets to local organizers for use at events
  • Using social media, ask your members to “take a break” from traffic by walking or biking instead, and sign up for air quality alerts.

Click any graphic to be taken to it’s page for easy sharing!

Protect_Our_Air-pollenProtect_Our_Air-trafficProtect_Our_Air-chart

Week 1, April 7th – 11th — The first week starts with a focus on asthma, allergies and pollen using Maryland Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Crystal Upperman and Cliff Mitchell as the messengers. Download the social media graphic of Crystal and Cliff.

  • Maryland’s Crystal Upperman & Dr. Cliff Mitchell know our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Think your allergies are bad now? Maryland’s climate is changing. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Think asthma is a problem now? Maryland’s climate is changing. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Think pollen season is bad now? Maryland’s climate is changing. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!

Week 2, April 14th – 18th — The focus on the second week is things that people can do to reduce air pollution and increase their own health, like biking and walking, using Dr. Cindy Parker from Johns Hopkins as the messenger. Download the social media graphic of Cindy.

  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker knows our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Walk instead. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Bike instead. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Use public transportation instead. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Carpool instead. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!

Week 3, April 21st – 25th — Asthma is a growing problem among Maryland’s children that can be triggered by many causes that will likely be affected by climate change, such as pollen, air pollution and mold. Help Marylanders make the connection. Download the social media graphic of children’s asthma rates in Maryland.

  • Asthma’s up 40% among Maryland’s children. Our air, climate and health are connected. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Our climate’s changing. Higher temperatures and increased carbon dioxide result in more, and more allergenic, pollen. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Our climate’s changing. More frequent hot days will likely result in more frequent poor air quality days. Change It Up Maryland!
  • Our climate’s changing. Heavy rains and flooding can increase molds that trigger allergies and asthma attacks. Change It Up Maryland!

Week 4, April 28th – May 2nd — The World Health Organization has linked 1 in 8 deaths worldwide to air pollution. Encourage your followers to get the tools to find out when their local air quality will be poor.

Week 1 — The first week starts with a focus on asthma, allergies and pollen using Maryland Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Crystal Upperman and Cliff Mitchell as the messengers.

  • Maryland’s Crystal Upperman & Dr. Cliff Mitchell know our #airclimatehealth #rconnected. #changeitupMD
  • Think your allergies are bad now? Maryland’s climate’s changing. #airclimatehealth #rconnected #changeitupMD
  • Think asthma is a problem now? Maryland’s climate’s changing. #airclimatehealth #rconnected #changeitupMD
  • Think pollen season is bad now? Maryland’s climate’s changing. #airclimatehealth #rconnected #changeitupMD

Week 2 — The focus on the second week is things that people can do to reduce air pollution and increase their own health, like biking and walking, using Dr. Cindy Parker from Johns Hopkins as the messenger.

  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker knows our #airclimatehealth #rconnected. #changeitupMD
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Walk instead.  #airclimatehealth #rconnected. #changeitupMD
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Bike instead.  #airclimatehealth #rconnected. #changeitupMD
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Use public transportation instead.  #airclimatehealth #rconnected. #changeitupMD
  • Maryland’s Dr. Cindy Parker prescribes taking a break from traffic. Carpool instead.  #airclimatehealth #rconnected. #changeitupMD

Week 3 — Asthma is a growing problem among Maryland’s children that can be triggered by many causes that will likely be affected by climate change, such as pollen, air pollution and mold. Help Marylanders make the connection.

  • Asthma’s up 40% among Maryland’s children. #airclimatehealth #rconnected #changeitupMD
  • Our climate’s changing. Higher temperatures and increased carbon dioxide result in more, and more allergenic, pollen. #changeitupMD
  • Our climate’s changing. More frequent hot days will likely result in more frequent poor air quality days. #changeitupMD
  • Our climate’s changing. Heavy rains and flooding can increase molds that trigger allergies and asthma attacks. #changeitupMD

Week 4 — The World Health Organization has linked 1 in 8 deaths worldwide to air pollution. Encourage your followers to get the tools to find out when their local air quality will be poor.

Ask your members to take photos of themselves either biking or walking with a sign that reads “Change It Up Maryland!”